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The Hierophant

Eat Soup

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2 leeks

Big sweet potato

2 tins tomato

Tin of coconut milk

Tumeric

Garlic (one or two bulbs to taste)

Vegetable stock (about 750 ml)

 

Chop the leeks and fry in some oil until soft.

Roast the garlic for 40 mins.

 

Add the tumeric to taste.

Add the tomatoes.

Chop the sweet potato and add it.

Add the stock.

 

Simmer until the potato is soft.

 

Add the roasted garlic and the coconut milk and blend.

 

You can add stuff like paprika and chilli flakes if you like a bit of heat. 

 

You can scale this one up nicely and it's extremely nice and nutritious. 

 

 

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Zuppa Toscana

 

For the Italian sausage:

Pork mince - 500g

Italian seasoning - 1tbsp

Salt - 1tbsp

Sugar - 1tsp

Fennel seed - 1/2tsp

Chilli flakes - 1/2tsp

Black pepper - 1tsp

Red wine vinegar - 1tbsp

 

Onion - 1, diced

Garlic - 3 cloves, crushed or finely chopped

Chilli flakes - 1/2tsp

Streaky bacon - 6-8 rashers

New potatoes - 250-300g, chopped into 1/2 or 1/4 depending on size (you want bitesize chunks)

Chopped kale - Couple of handfuls (I normally just use frozen pre-chopped stuff for convenience and remove any big stalk bits)

Chicken stock - 900ml (I've made it with homemade stock before but tbh a cube is fine for this)

Double cream - 250-300ml

Freshly grated parmesan - to taste

Salt & pepper - to taste

 

- Cook the bacon till crisp. Either grill the rashers whole and chop it up afterwards, or chop it up first then fry

- Mix the sausage ingredients together in a bowl. Brown in a little oil, chopping up into bitesize chunks as it cooks, then remove to a (different) bowl. Depending on the surface area of the pan, you may need to do this in a couple of batches

- Add a little more oil to the pan if necessary and fry the onion till soft. Add the garlic and chilli flakes and cook for a minute longer

- Add the potatoes and chicken stock. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for about 15 mins

- Add the sausage and kale and simmer for 5 mins longer

- Add the cream and parmesan (I normally use a good handful of finely grated stuff). Simmer for another 5 minutes. Season if needed

- Stir in half the bacon, then serve warm topped with more parmesan and bacon

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We've had soups in a couple of threads recently so thought I'd thread bump this from our historical selection of soup based threads (the other 2 seem to be about dieting and how long before it goes rancid so this one seemed the pick).

 

I posted a nice beef goulash soup in the Thermomix thread, but will share their recipe here as no reason other than convenience this couldn't be done conventionally, the blend of spices gave this a nice depth of flavour, I added a couple of cubed spuds for a bit more chunkiness.

 

1 garlic clove 

200 g onions, quartered

40 g olive oil 

500 g stewing steak, diced (2 cm)

30 g tomato purée 

3 tomatoes, diced

1 beef stock cube (for 0.5 l), crumbled

760 g water 

1 Tbsp dried marjoram 

2 Tbsp sweet paprika 

1 tsp hot paprika 

½ tsp caraway seeds 

1 dried bay leaf 

Tabasco® sauce, to taste

1 tsp fine sea salt 

½ tsp ground black pepper 

30 g plain flour 

200 g red peppers, sliced (1 cm)

200 g green peppers, sliced (1 cm)

 

Place garlic, onions and oil in mixing bowl then chop 3 sec/speed 5. Scrape down sides of mixing bowl with spatula then sauté 3 min/120°C/speed 1.

Add beef and tomato pureé then sauté 5 min/120°C//speed .

Add tomatoes, beef stock, 700 g water, marjoram, sweet paprika, hot paprika, caraway seeds, bay leaf, Tabasco®, salt and pepper then cook 35 min/100°C//speed 1. Meanwhile, mix flour and remaining 60 g water in a bowl until smooth.

Add flour mixture, red peppers and green peppers then cook 8 min/100°C//speed 1. Remove bay leaf then transfer to serving bowls. Garnish with oregano (if using) and serve hot with crusty bread.

 

gou.thumb.jpg.2de7c49d2ae78a9f901a644f88fc5d4d.jpg

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I rarely make soup but when I do I make a roasted carrot and garlic soup. So simple. 

 

750g carrots peeled and sliced in half. 

3 or 4 decent sized garlic cloves.

Peel and quarter an onion.

Put all on an oiled oven tray with some sage and roast for 45 mins at gas 6 or 200c.

Take out of oven and let cool slightly. Peel the garlic bulbs out of their skins.

Make a pint of veg stock and blend it all together. 

 

Add a few table spoons of double cream once it's cooled. 

 

Really flippin nice and dead simple.

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2 hours ago, Foxworth said:

I rarely make soup but when I do I make a roasted carrot and garlic soup. So simple. 

 

750g carrots peeled and sliced in half. 

3 or 4 decent sized garlic cloves.

Peel and quarter an onion.

Put all on an oiled oven tray with some sage and roast for 45 mins at gas 6 or 200c.

Take out of oven and let cool slightly. Peel the garlic bulbs out of their skins.

Make a pint of veg stock and blend it all together. 

 

Add a few table spoons of double cream once it's cooled. 

 

Really flippin nice and dead simple.


Garlic cloves or bulbs?

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18 minutes ago, The Hierophant said:


Garlic cloves or bulbs?

 

Just a couple of cloves, sorry my error. I guess if you really like your garlic then maybe a whole bulb might be ok. But for me, I think it might be a bit much. I just chuck a couple of cloves in the tray with the carrots. To be honest, I don't really measure anything for this recipe. Just some carrots, garlic, a bit of sage. Cook. Blend with stock and a bit of cream.

 

Honestly, it's really really nice.

 

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I like the look of that roasted veggie soup - you get so much flavour out of roasting them and getting a bit of colour on them.

 

Think I read in another soup thread here somebody said cooking a bit of rice then blitzing it gives a similar result to adding a bit of cream (my other half is dairy intolerant)

 

Just had that beef goulash soup and its fantastic, smashed my previous goulash stew recipes in terms of flavour and texture and everything.

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1 hour ago, Gotters said:

I like the look of that roasted veggie soup - you get so much flavour out of roasting them and getting a bit of colour on them.

 

Think I read in another soup thread here somebody said cooking a bit of rice then blitzing it gives a similar result to adding a bit of cream (my other half is dairy intolerant)

 

Just had that beef goulash soup and its fantastic, smashed my previous goulash stew recipes in terms of flavour and texture and everything.

Have you tried coconut milk?

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2 minutes ago, Horribleman said:

Have you tried coconut milk?

 

thanks, but I have an almost pathological aversion to even the faintest whiff of coconut, even Timotei shampoo gives me the heaves

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4 hours ago, Gotters said:

 

thanks, but I have an almost pathological aversion to even the faintest whiff of coconut, even Timotei shampoo gives me the heaves

Oat milk might work. I've not actually tried cooking with it, but the internet seems to think it works in cookery. Oatly Whole is my choice, and it's certainly nice and creamy-tasting (definitely tastes of oats though, which is great on cereal (I prefer it to cow's milk now), and probably still far more acceptable than coconut if you're averse to that).

 

Would be interested to know if the rice trick works though - I don't often buy oat milk, so any store-cupboard based tricks are super-useful. (I'd generally just chuck a handful of red lentils in to thicken and add a bit of texture and body, but that does mean much of what I cook ends up a little samey.)

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On 28/10/2019 at 12:25, Gotters said:

 

Think I read in another soup thread here somebody said cooking a bit of rice then blitzing it gives a similar result to adding a bit of cream (my other half is dairy intolerant)

 

 

Yeah I saw Chef John doing that in his tomato soup recipe. You can also throw in some cashews if you have a powerful enough blender. Also Chef Steps has a recipe for an onion cream as a replacement for dairy. 

 

 

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On 26/10/2019 at 17:05, Foxworth said:

I rarely make soup but when I do I make a roasted carrot and garlic soup. So simple. 

 

750g carrots peeled and sliced in half. 

3 or 4 decent sized garlic cloves.

Peel and quarter an onion.

Put all on an oiled oven tray with some sage and roast for 45 mins at gas 6 or 200c.

Take out of oven and let cool slightly. Peel the garlic bulbs out of their skins.

Make a pint of veg stock and blend it all together. 

 

Add a few table spoons of double cream once it's cooled. 

 

Really flippin nice and dead simple.

 

I made this for lunch today and it was absolutely delicious!

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@PK

 

Thanks pal. Can't remember where I found the recipe but it was during a time i was cooking some enriching soups for my father in law after he had a big operation. Thankfully he is ok now. 

 

I always prefer a smoother soup than one with chunks. I find that chunky soups are just not chunky enough and I'd rather have a stew or casserole instead. 

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72f50ee7-edd4-4464-8f07-cd33b4dce6b6.thumb.jpg.aace60ae7a5fa2c690c997b7c1ff796a.jpg

 

I didn't put cream in it, but made up for it with the amount of vegan butter on my roll.

 

I definitely prefer creamy, rich soups to chunky ones as well @Foxworth

 

I'm making cauliflower soup today:

 

1 large head of cauliflower cut into florets

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

Fine sea salt

1 medium red onion, chopped

2 cloves garlic, pressed or minced

500ml vegetable broth

2 tablespoons butter

1/2 lemon's juice

¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg

 

Season and then roast the cauliflower in 2 tablespoons of the olive oil for 45 mins

Fry the onion and garlic in the other tablespoon of olive oil

Add the cauliflower florets to the onion & garlic and fry for 5-7 minutes

Add the stock and simmer for 20 minutes

Blend while adding the butter, nutmeg and lemon juice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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my first trial of a dairy replacement technique in a soup - this leek and potato soup had 100ml of milk or cream in original.

 

I replaced that with an extra 100ml of veg stock in the base, and 1/3 of a cup of white rice, you then cook it up with the main soup and blitz.

 

initial view is super impressive, I'd swear this was a rich creamy dairy heavy soup (and I'm not somebody who will claim you can replace things with alternatives lightly) - can see a thickened nature to the soup from the blitzed cooked rice, may need to experiment with how much and type of rice as the amount of starch varies wildly from differing grain lengths and will be interesting to see the consistency after chilling and reheating.

 

As a first attempt though I'm postive, its not one of those 'it'll do' alternatives, I can't tell the difference and don't feel the need to try them side by side to see as the taste/texture is great

 

Screenshot_08_11_2019__12_17.thumb.jpg.ef35d8066f99cf7a3547e1b0d9dcd7a5.jpg

 

I think this is the great thing with soup, how so few ingredients can taste so good - this is leeks, potato, oil, butter, veg stock, pinch of nutmeg & white pepper then general seasoning, plus the thickening rice and garnish. 

 

 

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Thread needs more lentils.

 

poverty version: boil lentils in water with salt

slightly better: use stock cube

better version: usual fry onions and garlic etc first, add spices at end of frying, add this to boiled lentils

best version: add butter or cream or coconut milk
bestest version: use proper stock, a bit of saffron, blend if you like it smooth

 

It sounds like a joke but plain boiled lentils are pretty nice. Everything else just makes them better.

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The line between lentil soup, dal, pottage, pease pudding, ful, mushy peas  etc. is indeed a blurry one. Entire civilisations survived by dipping bread into one of the above.

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6 minutes ago, MemoryLeak said:

Thread needs more lentils.

 

poverty version: boil lentils in water with salt

slightly better: use stock cube

better version: usual fry onions and garlic etc first, add spices at end of frying, add this to boiled lentils

best version: add butter or cream or coconut milk
bestest version: use proper stock, a bit of saffron, blend if you like it smooth

 

It sounds like a joke but plain boiled lentils are pretty nice. Everything else just makes them better.

I make something similar, but it's based on one that a couple of supermarkets do.

 

Fry up some finely diced onions until softened. Add some garlic toward the end. When it's all nicely soft throw in a tin of tomatoes (I prefer whole ones (I *think* they taste better) which I chop in the pan now with my knife, but you can use a tin of ready-chopped instead). Next throw in some dried red lentils - can't provide a quantity or weight, but - I dunno - most of a mugful would be a good start. Then add maybe the same amount of water (I boil it in the kettle first, so it doesn't cool the pan too much) - don't worry about the quantity, you can always add more later if needed, or reduce it more if you chucked too much in. I also add some vegetable bouillon powder (a stock cube would work instead). Cooking this for 20 minutes to soften the lentils and let it reduce will get you something tasty.

 

But you really want to be pimping it. When you add the lentils you can chuck in diced carrots/potatoes/peppers/courgettes/whatever and they'll all add to the finished thing. Also chuck in herbs, and maybe spices too (a little smoked paprika perhaps)  - just be careful not to overdo it since it's going to reduce as it cooks - err on the side of caution here, you can always fix it later. Once it has reduced you can tweak the seasoning, or perhaps add a little sugar if your tomatoes were a bit tart, or a dash of lemon juice if it's missing something. At the end you get something really hearty and comforting, and it's a great chance to use up bits of leftover veg.

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