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No longer the place for your yaaarrrr / back up needs :(

 

 

EmuParadise is Changing

Many of you are aware that the situation with regards to emulation sites has been changing recently. What you probably don't know is that we at EmuParadise have been dealing with similar issues for all 18 years of our existence.

From receiving threatening letters in the early days to our hosts suddenly shutting down our servers due to complaints, we've seen it all. We've always complied with takedown requests but as you can see, that is no guarantee of anything.

I started EmuParadise 18 years ago because I never got to play many of these amazing retro games while growing up in India and I wanted other people to be able to experience them. Over the years, many folks have joined in and contributed to this vision and I think I can say that we've been successful in spreading our passion for retro games far and wide.

Through the years I've worked tirelessly with the rest of the EmuParadise team to ensure that everyone could get their fix of retro gaming. We've received thousands of emails from people telling us how happy they've been to rediscover and even share their childhood with the next generations in their families. We've had emails from soldiers at war saying that the only way they got through their days was to be lost in the retrogames that they played from when they were children. We've got emails from brothers who have lost their siblings to cancer and were able to find solace in playing the games they once did as children. There are countless stories like these.

It's been a long and beautiful journey with many ups and downs. When I started EmuParadise things could have gone either way. But right now the direction they are going in could not be more than clear.

So where does that leave us?

It's not worth it for us to risk potentially disastrous consequences. I cannot in good conscience risk the futures of our team members who have contributed to the site through the years. We run EmuParadise for the love of retro games and for you to be able to revisit those good times. Unfortunately, it's not possible right now to do so in a way that makes everyone happy and keeps us out of trouble.

This is an extremely emotional decision for me after running this site for so many years. But I believe it is the right thing for us at this point of time.

Thus, we have decided to make a new start. We will continue to be passionate retro gamers and will keep doing cool stuff around retro games. But you won't be able to get your games from here for now. Where we go with this is up to us and up to you.

We'll still have our emulators database, the community, and everything that comes along with that.

We have already made several plans of what is going to happen next. It's going to be a fun new beginning and there's going to be lots to come! We'd also love to hear from you in the comments about what you think we should do. But for now, we need to make this change. We've served the community for 18 glorious years and it's been a hell of a ride!

But every end is a new beginning and we're excited to find a way forward to continue being your #1 emulation destination.

Thank you for supporting us through this journey. We could not have done so much without you visiting us, telling your friends about us, uploading screenshots and descriptions, telling us when something was wrong, letting us know when we messed up, and more. Thank you for being a part of our community and encouraging us through all these years.


Read more at https://www.emuparadise.me/emuparadise-changing.php#EfTfpOcP6EoLCRzT.99

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Meh. It's not legal content so was bound to happen eventually, shame though as was a very good site and tended to have the best version without viruses!

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My other favourite planetemu.net has suffered a similar change recently but I wasn't aware it was because of a wider crack down.

 

Sad times.

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I understand this, as a big emulation fan I am sad to see it go, but at the same time it's inevitable.  We all think that roms are no big deal - you can't buy that old game anywhere so why not yarr it? No-one is losing out because you can't buy the game anyway.

 

Then, Nintendo release a Super NES classic and the hardcore Nintendo fans don't buy it because they have all those games and many more on their Wii, or PS Vita. The gaming companies seem to be utilising that old content again in new products and because you cannot predict what products they might come up with next, you can't tell how easy emulation access today will affect the success of products of the future.  I think the ZX Spectrum Vega looked like a great idea and a good product, but the PSP Go makes a way better Spectrum Emulator with more games, so there's no reason for anyone to buy it (even if it wasn't a complete pile of shit, the machine itself isn't something I'd buy, but who knows if I'd have been more interested if I hadn't been playing Speccy games already on the equipment I already had).

 

The daft part of all this is that Emu Paradise had so many restrictions (download one at a time, click here, click there, click here to download, generating links, click link) that the alternatives are not much more complex, and the hardcore that use emulation sites could easily get on a torrent site and download the whole lot in one go.

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I'll be sad to see it go, such an easy site to use with no dodgy virus links and a pretty comprehensive list of ROMs.

As others have said, it's inevitable that it happened, I'm surprised it lasted so long.

 

Bring back Dave's Video Game Classics!

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26 minutes ago, dumpster said:

Then, Nintendo release a Super NES classic and the hardcore Nintendo fans don't buy it because they have all those games and many more on their Wii, or PS Vita.

 

You are just making this up. The NES and SNES mini's were incredibly successful and sold in huge numbers.

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1 hour ago, cubik said:

 

Bring back Dave's Video Game Classics!

 

Wow! That's where I downloaded my first Mame Roms from in late '97 :P

 

Rom sites back then really were the undiscovered country.

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Disappointed but not surprised. I used to find a bunch of weird MAME and PSX curios on there, and it was useful for finding specific entries in a long-running or complex series/franchise.

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1 hour ago, Lorfarius said:

 

You are just making this up. The NES and SNES mini's were incredibly successful and sold in huge numbers.

 

They did sell well, and no-ones arguing that point. They would surely sell better in a world where no-ones been able to play those games for 20 years. 

 

 I didn't buy one, and if I hadn't been able to play Contra 3 since 1994, I'd have been first in line.  

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5 hours ago, cubik said:

I'll be sad to see it go, such an easy site to use with no dodgy virus links and a pretty comprehensive list of ROMs.

As others have said, it's inevitable that it happened, I'm surprised it lasted so long.

 

Bring back Dave's Video Game Classics!

 

Oh god no. He turned full nazi and had a forum dedicated to that shit in the site's later years.

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18 minutes ago, Camel said:

 

Oh god no. He turned full nazi and had a forum dedicated to that shit in the site's later years.

Did he? Shit.. In that case, fuck him and his nazi mates.

 

I had fond memories of my first exposure to MAME on DavesVGC, downloading Pac Man, Galaxian, Dig Dug etc at work and taking them home on floppy.

I spent hours playing them on my Pentium 133.

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Okay okay I understand why it had to go, and I'm probably not the only one who would go there year in, year out and wonder how the hell they were still standing. But I will miss it for getting hold of specific games easily (well, with a bit of hoop-jumping).  Like any site that gets really popular it got noticed, in fact it would often come up at the top of searches for ROMs, which I don't doubt is how Nintendo found them.

 

As for old games being easier than ever to play, watch this interesting talk about the challenge of selling old games vs emulation.

 

Acknowledging companies like Nintendo can do what they can to protect their IP, they'll always put their money before keeping the gaming culture built up over the last 40-odd years alive, because they and Sony and whoever can just take these games away with the press of a button, and we all lose out.

 

And yeah, DavesClassics, sad to hear he's fallen off, but I very well remember when that site was THE go-to for ROMs, and then one day it became happy, shiny all-new DavesClassics that was totally legit thanks to our friends in The Tetris Company and their lawyers.

 

 

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19 hours ago, dumpster said:

 

They did sell well, and no-ones arguing that point. They would surely sell better in a world where no-ones been able to play those games for 20 years. 

 

 I didn't buy one, and if I hadn't been able to play Contra 3 since 1994, I'd have been first in line.  

 

The NES Mini outsold all other hardware - including Xbox, PS4 and Switch - in June, according to official sales figures. Not sure it could do much better than that.

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53 minutes ago, ScouserInExile said:

 

The NES Mini outsold all other hardware - including Xbox, PS4 and Switch - in June, according to official sales figures. Not sure it could do much better than that.

 

It would have sold at least one more!  To me, for starters.

 

No-one is arguing that the sales were excellent.  But a SNES Mini is a device that lets you re-live those memories of games you used to love.  If you are already doing that and are still playing those games then that has to affect sales.  If I'd not been able to play Contra 3 since 1995 I would have been first in line, but I played that yesterday. I'm working my way through Metroid Fusion at the moment on a Vita, so if Nintendo re-release it next week I'll be able to buy it and re-live those happy memories of last week.

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I think the biggest issue I have with it shutting down is that while I get it that companies want to make money out of retro games (and some do a very good job of it, like Nintendo), they're taking a totally blanket approach to it all. You can't have any ROMs hosted on the website.

 

It's fine if you want to play Super Mario World, Donkey Kong or Impossible Mission - there are ways you can legally play them (SNES Mini, NES Mini, C64 Mini etc), but what about the games that you can't play? Say you want to play Wizball on the C64, because you own a C64 and have an SD disk drive? Or what about some rare NES game that you don't want to pay £200 for, but has never been re-released?  Now you're not allowed to, because it's a total ban on all ROMs?

 

While I think what Nintendo is doing with the NES and SNES Mini is great, it's still a selective history and selective library of games. I want to play Home Alone, even though it's shit because I had it when I was younger. Now I'm not allowed?

 

I know there are more Netflix style commercial services coming along where you can get access to a library of old games, but to be honest I'm not interested in spending another £10 a month (and having to install more shit on my laptop) just to play something I once had or would like to try.

 

 

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3 minutes ago, gone fishin' said:

I think the biggest issue I have with it shutting down is that while I get it that companies want to make money out of retro games (and some do a very good job of it, like Nintendo), they're taking a totally blanket approach to it all. You can't have any ROMs hosted on the website.

 

It's fine if you want to play Super Mario World, Donkey Kong or Impossible Mission - there are ways you can legally play them (SNES Mini, NES Mini, C64 Mini etc), but what about the games that you can't play? Say you want to play Wizball on the C64, because you own a C64 and have an SD disk drive? Or what about some rare NES game that you don't want to pay £200 for, but has never been re-released?  Now you're not allowed to, because it's a total ban on all ROMs?

 

While I think what Nintendo is doing with the NES and SNES Mini is great, it's still a selective history and selective library of games. I want to play Home Alone, even though it's shit because I had it when I was younger. Now I'm not allowed?

 

I know there are more Netflix style commercial services coming along where you can get access to a library of old games, but to be honest I'm not interested in spending another £10 a month (and having to install more shit on my laptop) just to play something I once had or would like to try.

 

 

Definitely give that talk above a watch, it does cover a lot of what you mention.

 

Looking at it from Nintendo's point of view, they have to take the lot down in a "give them an inch and they'll take a mile" way. It's not merely about protecting their IP, it's the whole principle of emulation and people setting up their own systems that they're trying to undermine. Companies like Nintendo want users to see them as the source for your nostalgia needs. Remember, we're talking about the sort of people who, when presented with a Mario game, go "oh wow, I haven't played that since I was a nipper!". It's also probably easier to just nuke a whole site than send individual takedown requests for games.

 

 

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Sorry to hear about Emu's woes. Didn't realise you were a member on here too!

 

Like many I share the same view - for example I wouldn't pay £30+ for SNES and MD games that in their day were a bit 'meh'. What about playing manky old Speccy tapes that've pretty much work out? How do you replace those? Are they just consigned to history?

 

There are so many game publishers from back in't day who're just no longer around so the IP legal position can become incredibly complicated with acquirer after acquirer (often not even knowing what IP is in the bundle).

 

I've no shame in emulating roms on genuine hardware for things that are several generations old. Unless the owners of the IP actively use it to produce content we want then they are part of the problem by just sitting on a pile of great IP's and litigating anyone how tries to use them. 

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Just another symptom of the wild west days of the internet coming to an end, and civilisation/law and order being imposed on the frontier, I guess.

 

I predict that anyone who wants to download ROMs or any copyright infringing material will find it easy enough to do on the dark net, in 10 years or so time. 

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1 hour ago, gone fishin' said:

I think the biggest issue I have with it shutting down is that while I get it that companies want to make money out of retro games (and some do a very good job of it, like Nintendo), they're taking a totally blanket approach to it all. You can't have any ROMs hosted on the website.

 

The thing is, I'd happily pay for re-releases of older games if only they were re-released :P I've emulated most of the Street Fighter series in the past but I still bought the recent compilation because it's way more convenient to have everything in one place. You can't say you're losing potential sales when (eShop aside) you're not making an effort to bring the games back. ;) 

 

We'd all buy the re-releases right?

 

Right?

 

4ea.jpg

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59 minutes ago, Anne Summers said:

Just another symptom of the wild west days of the internet coming to an end, and civilisation/law and order being imposed on the frontier, I guess.

 

I predict that anyone who wants to download ROMs or any copyright infringing material will find it easy enough to do on the dark net, in 10 years or so time. 

 

Eh? It's not difficult to find ROMs from different places. Just one big site that's been hit (the main guy seems to be living in the US so wasn't exactly hiding) and another that's pulled the files, just means they will pop up in all sorts of other places. How many times has PirateBay been attacked and pulled offline over the years? Has it meant the end of torrents?  How many times have the UK ISPs copyright blocked such things... something else will come along it always does.

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And you can blame Disney for all of this. It used to be that works fell out of copyright after a fixed time, and Disney got the law changed to protect their old movies, despite some of them being made based on out of copyright stories like Snow White.

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4 hours ago, Anne Summers said:

Just another symptom of the wild west days of the internet coming to an end, and civilisation/law and order being imposed on the frontier, I guess.

 

I predict that anyone who wants to download ROMs or any copyright infringing material will find it easy enough to do on the dark net, in 10 years or so time. 

Extreme porn, snuff movies, highly-classified information, stolen credit card and bank account info - and a full set of PC Engine ROMs.

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This actually makes me sad :( I used it a dozen times over the last 15(!) years or so, basically started when I was a teenager. Fuck :(

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There is also an argument (well espoused by Frank Cifaldi on Twitter) that ROM sites and piracy have helped preserve gaming history.

 

There is a lot of talk now about "Netflix for games" and "games as a service".

It could be perilous for retro gaming.

 

What happens if a company still exists, but has no access to original materials and no way to prove its own IP rights?

 

Some examples of the problems already being encountered.

Taito no longer had the source code for Bubble Bobble when it was preparing the Taito Collections for PS2/Xbox.

Remakers cannot find who holds the rights for games they want to remake - someone approached a leading British programmer to remake his old game, but the company the games had been created for had been taken over and the lawyers for that company didn't even know they held the rights to the game!

 

I support and buy new games being made for retro formats.

I buy new games for new consoles.

I buy remakes and compilations of old games for new hardware.

 

And I don't feel guilty about downloading ROMs to experience something I haven't played before and that is not easily accessible any other way.

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I'm amazed it managed to keep going this long, when it was so well-known. Earlier in the year I grabbed all the PS2 Shin Megami Tensei games from there, just straight-up ISO downloads. I'm going to stress that I actually own all those games digitally on PS3, but these days it's more convenient and feels more secure to fire them up on an emulator than gamble on an increasingly wonky PS3 console.

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