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http://www.bbc.co.uk/pressoffice/pressrele.../sherlock.shtml

New drama Sherlock commences filming

Date: 11.03.2010

Category: TV Drama; BBC One; Wales

BBC Wales Drama, BBC One and Hartswood Films announce the start of filming on Sherlock, a contemporary remake of the Arthur Conan Doyle classic, starring Benedict Cumberbatch (Starter For Ten, Stuart: A Life Backwards) as the new Sherlock Holmes and Martin Freeman (The Office, Hot Fuzz) as his loyal friend, Doctor John Watson. Rupert Graves (God On Trial, Midnight Man) plays Inspector Lestrade.

The drama is co-created by the amazing partnership of Steven Moffat (Doctor Who, Coupling) and Mark Gatiss (The League Of Gentlemen, Doctor Who, Crooked House) and produced by Sue Vertue (Coupling, The Cup).

The three x 90-minute films, written by Steven Moffat, Mark Gatiss and Steve Thompson (Whipping It Up, Mutual Friends), are being directed by Paul McGuigan (Lucky Number Slevin, Gangster No 1, The Acid House) and Euros Lyn (Doctor Who, Torchwood).

Sherlock is a thrilling, funny, fast-paced take on the crime drama genre set in present day London.

The iconic details from Conan Doyle's original books remain – they live at the same address, have the same names and, somewhere out there, Moriarty is waiting for them.

Piers Wenger, Head of Drama, BBC Wales, says: "Our Sherlock is a dynamic superhero in a modern world, an arrogant, genius sleuth driven by a desire to prove himself cleverer than the perpetrator and the police, everyone in fact."

Sherlock is produced by Hartswood Films, continuing their fruitful relationship with the BBC. Past productions include Coupling, Men Behaving Badly, Jekyll and, most recently, The Cup for BBC Two.

Steven Moffat says: "Everything that matters about Holmes and Watson is the same.

"Conan Doyle's stories were never about frock coats and gas light; they're about brilliant detection, dreadful villains and blood-curdling crimes – and frankly, to hell with the crinoline. Other detectives have cases, Sherlock Holmes has adventures, and that's what matters.

"Mark and I have been talking about this project for years, on long train rides to Cardiff for Doctor Who. Quite honestly, we'd still be talking about it if Sue Vertue of Hartswood Films (conveniently also my wife) hadn't sat us down for lunch and got us to work."

Mark Gatiss says: "The fact that Steven, myself and millions of others are still addicted to Conan Doyle's brilliant stories is testament to their indestructibility. They're as vital, lurid, thrilling and wonderful as they ever were.

"It's a dream come true to be making a new TV series and in Benedict and Mark we have the perfect Holmes and Watson for our time."

Sue Vertue says: "Steven and Mark are such huge fans of the Sherlock Holmes stories that I had a feeling they would just go on and on talking about it, so I picked the Criterion for our lunch as I knew of its iconic significance in the meeting of Sherlock and Watson and thought it might get the boys' attention! It did, and what has evolved from that meeting is hugely exciting."

Sherlock was commissioned by Ben Stephenson, Controller, BBC Drama Commissioning, and Jay Hunt, Controller, BBC One.

It is shooting in Wales and on location in London. Sherlock is executive produced by Beryl Vertue, Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat.

GJ

Information for viewers

More content about Sherlock will be published, as transmission approaches, on this page:

www.bbc.co.uk/tv/comingup/sherlock

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Could be enjoyable! Quite how much ongoing attention it'll get from Moffat is doubtful, though. Running Doctor Who is far more than a full-time job, so it's possible that Gatiss will be the go-to guy on this.

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This starts on Sunday 25th July at 9pm. Seems to have snuck up somewhat - not sure if that's such a good sign - but here's a trailer nontheless:

[yt]cSQq_bC5kIw[/yt]

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Yeah, was really good. Was a bit worried, but Freeman was great as normal, and Cumberpatch was only irritating for a little bit. The last few lines were an absolute mess though. I can't stop them, and Gatiss in general really, spoiling the rest ever so slightly.

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I really like anything Sherlock Holmes, and this was no exception. Really well done, and

Mycroft being in the secret service was a nice touch.

Looking forward to next Sundays episode.

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This was really great, though it was funny how similar it was to Doctor Who.

I guessed it was the cabbie the second you saw the cab through the restaurant window though. It kind of undermines the whole "Sherlock is an incredible genius" when I think to not just check the passenger and he doesn't.

Still, it was some great misdirection making you think that Mycroft was Moriarti though.

It's a pity that I doubt they'll make any more after these three are done - Moffat will be too busy with Who, and even after that's done he'll probably be winging off to Hollywood.

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I really enjoyed it, but it was almost like watching a parallel universe Doctor Who at some points. Looking forward to the next two episodes though.

Mind you, I hated the text on screen and the section where he's chasing the cab was a mess. It looked like editing for the ADD crowd.

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Mind you, I hated the text on screen and the section where he's chasing the cab was a mess. It looked like editing for the ADD crowd.

I thought the bit where he held his hands to his head and psychic'd the cab's route was a bit much, he could have just stopped and looked contemplative for a second.

Re. Dr Who, obviously being written by the same guys and the titular character having auditioned for the role of the Dr there are going to be some stylistic elements in common. Apparently Matt Smith auditioned for Watson, but he was 'too barmy'- that audition was how Moffat knew about him for Who. Good decision IMO, Smith wouldn't have opposed Cumberbatch's Holmes like Freeman did.

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Watched this on iPlayer last night having missed it on Sunday - thoroughly entertaining and it's good to see Freeman doing what he does best :)

Cumberbatch was odd and quirky and he was reminicent of Matt Smiths Doctor Who at times.

The cabbie reminded me very much of a work colleague of mine which is scary!

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Watched this on iPlayer last night having missed it on Sunday - thoroughly entertaining and it's good to see Freeman doing what he does best :)

You mean THAT face.....

BUZZFEEMAN.jpg

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Watson chatting up the ditzy brunette in the car was funny :)

As for the whole pill business, who's to say both were identical and both poison - just that he didn't eat it?

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I think it was a case of writing themselves into a corner which they couldn't get out of.

Yeah - it seems that they'd committed themselves to using the plot device from "A Study in Scarlet" but without any of the original lengthy backstory to explain it.

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Much better than Moffat's other update of a Victorian classic (Jekyll) so far!

I’d been wondering all the way through if they were going to introduce Mycroft, and when that umbrella-leaning fellow first appeared, I thought for a moment that it might be him. But I quickly dismissed that and bought into their red herring that that was Moriarty. Shoulda stuck with my instincts!

Re. Dr Who, obviously being written by the same guys and the titular character having auditioned for the role of the Dr there are going to be some stylistic elements in common. Apparently Matt Smith auditioned for Watson, but he was 'too barmy'- that audition was how Moffat knew about him for Who. Good decision IMO, Smith wouldn't have opposed Cumberbatch's Holmes like Freeman did.

They definitely had a lot in common, but in terms of specific moments that were reminsiscent of the last series of Doctor Who, both The Eleventh Hour and A Study In Pink used ultra-slow-mo/bullet-time-esque/time-slice effects to illustrate the superhuman observation abilities of their lead character.

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It would have been nice if we'd actually learned his method with the pills though.

and saying 'choose a pill or i shoot you in the head' is hardly devious psychological trickery, is it?

I got the impression it was a mixture of actually being able to read what people would do and blind luck that got him through four victims. He had a terminal illness so nothing to lose really.

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It would have been nice if we'd actually learned his method with the pills though.

and saying 'choose a pill or i shoot you in the head' is hardly devious psychological trickery, is it?

I was expecting a Princess Bride style battle of wits

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I didn't really like it. I get easily-bored of Freeman doing his usual thing, and Gatiss, too. Such a one-dimensional actor. Or type-cast. Or type-cast because he is one-dimensional.

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I was expecting a Princess Bride style battle of wits

I was reminded of that during the scene in the cab, actually. Holmes was all 'you did this, so I think that, but she did this so I can't possibly think that!'.

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