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Civilization V

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Just a press release at the moment.

http://www.gamepro.com/article/news/214082...-gamepro-cover/

Civilization V takes this definitive strategy game series in new directions with the introduction of hexagon tiles allowing for deeper strategy, more realistic gameplay and stunning organic landscapes for players to explore as they expand their empire. The brand new engine orchestrates a spectacular visual experience that brings players closer to the Civ experience than ever, featuring fully animated leaders interacting with players from a screen-filling diplomatic scene and speaking in their native language for the first time. Wars between empires feel massive as armies dominate the landscape, and combat is more exciting and intense than ever before. The addition of ranged bombardment allows players to fire weapons from behind the front lines, challenging players to develop clever new strategies to guarantee victory on the battlefield. In addition to the new gameplay features debuting in Civilization V, an extensive suite of community, modding and multiplayer elements will also make an appearance.

It's a shame Soren Johnson is no longer at Firaxis as he did a fantastic job with IV. The switch to hexes is unexpected, I'm not enough of a grognard to know what kind of difference that will make.

Edit:

More info and screenshots at IGN.

http://pcmedia.ign.c...440167_640w.jpg

http://pcmedia.ign.c...550009_640w.jpg

http://www.firaxis.c...hots/civ5_3.jpg

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Oooh yay! Hexagons!

A decent 3D engine would be nice, Civ IV's grumbled even on high-spec machines.

Just hope we don't end up with a Star Trek-style rule about odd-numbered games being crap.

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Looking at those screenshots combined with the talk about massive armies and ranged bombardment makes me wonder if they're going for a more tactical approach to the combat; kind of like a turned based Total War. That would explain the move to hexagons. Could be amazing if so, I've always thought Civilization: Total War would be my perfect game.

Also, the official website is up.

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This is fantastic news. Civilisation 4 is an utterly fantastic tile where practically the only real areas where improvements are needed is in the military and online areas. If this can develop those areas then this game will be the end of me.

Woah, wait... Fall 2010?!?

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Runs smooth as silk on my old-school P4 3.2.

Same here on my P4 3.0. It was a little flaky on the for me on the largest map size when it was first released but ran absolutely fine after a patch or two.

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Runs smooth as silk on my old-school P4 3.2.

Perhaps it was my specific combination of hardware, but doing things like zooming out to world view caused it to stutter, and in long games with lots of players I'd be sitting around for minutes awaiting my turn. Generally it was fine though.

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I got very bored of Civ 4 after a while, and put it aside, preferring to get either super-detailed country management or in-depth and spectacular warfare from Paradox games or Total War games respectively. But Civ 2 was one of those formative games for me and I have hopes for Civ 5. Looks pretty at the very least, and it's about time it moved to hexes.

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I might be wrong with this, but doesn't a move to hexagons reduce tactical complexity, as you can move diagonally in Civ? With squares there are 8 possible directions to move in, with hexagons you only have 6 options...

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I might be wrong with this, but doesn't a move to hexagons reduce tactical complexity, as you can move diagonally in Civ? With squares there are 8 possible directions to move in, with hexagons you only have 6 options...

2 less movement options but more people can aim at one place I would have thought. I have never played a Civ game though...

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I might be wrong with this, but doesn't a move to hexagons reduce tactical complexity, as you can move diagonally in Civ? With squares there are 8 possible directions to move in, with hexagons you only have 6 options...

Good point. I wonder if they considered octagons? Its going to feel odd moving upwards/downwards in a zigzag motion

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Good point. I wonder if they considered octagons? Its going to feel odd moving upwards/downwards in a zigzag motion

The way it works out is that you have N, S, NE, NW, SE and SW relative to your own position. All you're losing is relative east and relative south, which are a bit crap anyway.

This approach means that all moves are the same distance, whereas diagonal had an advantage previously.

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A decent 3D engine would be nice, Civ IV's grumbled even on high-spec machines.

Runs fine on my MacBook (Core Duo (not 2), Intel made-from-clay graphics). Well, the demo does, anyway.

Hopefully Civ V will have the Civ Rev speed of play. Much as I loved old-Civ, Civ Rev just made everything better.

Also: new Alpha Centuri please.

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Hopefully Civ V will have the Civ Rev speed of play. Much as I loved old-Civ, Civ Rev just made everything better.

I was thinking it'd be nice if they had different complexity levels on top of the difficulty levels - so you could play a Civ Rev style game with shit hot AI or the full fat Civ with the difficulty turned down a few notches and then maybe one or two settings in the middle.

I really liked Civ Rev but felt it was a bit TOO streamlined in places (like diplomacy and the fact you couldn't build roads to specific locations).

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Hopefully Civ V will have the Civ Rev speed of play. Much as I loved old-Civ, Civ Rev just made everything better.

Nooooo! The last thing we need from this is the dumbed down style of Civ Rev.

To be honest, I'm struggling to think what needs to be added. Civ IV: Beyond The Sword is pretty much perfect.

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Nooooo! The last thing we need from this is the dumbed down style of Civ Rev.

To be honest, I'm struggling to think what needs to be added. Civ IV: Beyond The Sword is pretty much perfect.

I don't think I'd like another added layer of complexity that leads to more micromanagement and a slower game either. It's hard to find a balance with these things.

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Can we have Brian Reynolds's Sid Meier's Alpha Centauri 2 next please?

If only!, EA own the name, Sid works for Take-Two, Brian Reynolds is stuck developing casual crap at Zynga and Tim Train is doing management on some MMO being funded by some baseball guy.

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A bit more info from a Danish magazine.

  • Switch from squares to hexagons changing the way the game plays. More room for maneuvers and more tactical options.
  • Changes to combat. More depth in combat, no more stacking of units. This will lead to bigger focus on terrain.
  • Inspired by Panzer General.
  • Reintroduction of Bombardment, now archers and siege equipment can shoot over melee units.
  • Better diplomatic AI.
  • More diplomatic options between players.
  • Less "cheating" AI.
  • Religion is not a factor anymore.
  • Ressources are not infinite. For example one source of horse only supplies enough horses for 1 unit, but when that horseman dies the horses will respawn as a unit. (this confused me alittle, i guess we will have to watch it in action)
  • City States as a sort of small countries that never develop beyond their single city. They can provide bonusses if you befriend them, or you can take over their land.
  • Civics are out, now there is something called "Social Policies".
  • About the same amount of wonders, the tech tree will feel familiar. Great People still in.
  • Some victory conditions changed. For example in Conquest you only have to capture all the other capitals. Eliminates boring mop up phase.
  • Unique Civ leader bonusses, no more standard "Spiritual" or "Financial".
  • DirectX 11 support.
  • Built in webbrowser. Sid Meier is also working on a facebook application of Civilization.

http://apolyton.net/forums/showpost.php?p=...mp;postcount=23

Shame about the loss of religion, I thought that worked really well in IV.

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Well thanks, thread. Reading this made me boot up Beyond the Sword again at around 9pm, and I've just finished playing! Civ is gaming crack I swear.

Quite. Part of me hopes they don't do a Mac version 'cause if they do there goes a month of my life right there.

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Better diplomatic AI.

More diplomatic options between players.

Less "cheating" AI.

This sounds good. I hate how in civ4 when you met a new civilisation your only two greeting options are 'hello old chap' or 'im going to fucking kill you'

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