Jump to content
Monkeyboy

Any Fantasy recommendations?

Recommended Posts

I've been listening to the standard audiobooks ahead of the new one, they are decent and monsterously long as well. Just finished the second one and I was just struck by the fact that it's basically the Wheel of Time,  but not as good. I mean, still enjoying it, but there are massive parallels and while I'm sure he won't fall into nothing-happens-for-four-books trap, he's not as good a writer as Jordan. Hopefully the new book goes in a different direction but if it's all fake Egwene and Rand split into two have tea parties in not Rhuidean all book I won't be impressed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love the man's voice on the audiobooks but the woman is a bit dull. Which is ironic because she's called Kate Reading. I wonder if that's why they hired her

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 25/09/2017 at 17:49, The Grand Pursuivant said:

 

I just finished this. Started reading the Fitz books when I was 13, almost 20 years ago. Now it's over.

 

I don't think broken quite covers it. I feel like I've just been hit by an oncoming train.

 

Somebody hold me.

I'm on the last stretch and been reading these books since Assassins apprentice was released. God the pace of the last third of the book and the need to get to the end is unlike anything. Get to Bee ya bastard 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got Dancer's Lament by Ian C Esslemont for Christmas and devoured the book in a day (I was stuck on a bus for 6 hours, an airport for 2, and a plane for 3. Which helped.) 

 

It's the first in a trilogy of books, a prequel to the Malazan Books of the Fallen. It's centered around the stories of Dancer and Kellanved, who they were, where they came from, and how they begin their story together on their way to the founding of the Malazan Empire. 

 

This first book takes it slow, we only really get the very beginning of that story, but what we do get is a classic Malazan style story complete with conflicting agendas, powers, mysteries. All centered around a city being fought over, and a cast of separate characters each giving us a glimpse of the different sides of the conflict. 

 

I loved it, but then I've loved pretty much everything written in the Malazan universe. I immediately went and ordered the next book, Deadhouse Landing. If you loved the Malazan world and wanted to learn more about it's two mysterious protagonists, jump on board! 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Headache said:

I got Dancer's Lament by Ian C Esslemont for Christmas and devoured the book in a day (I was stuck on a bus for 6 hours, an airport for 2, and a plane for 3. Which helped.) 

 

It's the first in a trilogy of books, a prequel to the Malazan Books of the Fallen. It's centered around the stories of Dancer and Kellanved, who they were, where they came from, and how they begin their story together on their way to the founding of the Malazan Empire. 

 

This first book takes it slow, we only really get the very beginning of that story, but what we do get is a classic Malazan style story complete with conflicting agendas, powers, mysteries. All centered around a city being fought over, and a cast of separate characters each giving us a glimpse of the different sides of the conflict. 

 

I loved it, but then I've loved pretty much everything written in the Malazan universe. I immediately went and ordered the next book, Deadhouse Landing. If you loved the Malazan world and wanted to learn more about it's two mysterious protagonists, jump on board! 

 

Finished Deadhouse Landing a few weeks ago, in between my re-read of the main series. You'll definitely enjoy it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Kzo said:

 

Finished Deadhouse Landing a few weeks ago, in between my re-read of the main series. You'll definitely enjoy it!

Awesome! Can't wait for my Amazon delivery to arrive! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm disappointed with the latest Stormlight Archives book so far. It's a real slog and I'm over 20 hours in with the audiobook. There's very little intrigue or stuff to get excited about, and almost none of the cool ideas seen in the first two books. It doesn't help that most of the main characters plotlines are really tedious in this one as well. And barely anything has happened so far - most of the action has been in flashbacks. It's like he took all the boring and annoying bits out of the first two books and mashed them into this one, when really all I want is epic battles and intrigue on the Shattered Plains. Hope the second half of the book redeems itself because so far the expanded story is far from compelling. There's also so many side characters to remember from the old books that I don't know who half the people are, fortunately, Sanderson does try to give them brief introductions.

 

What do you folks think of Oathbringer, am I alone in my disappointment here? Maybe it does redeem itself eventually...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't read it yet, but I felt that way about the first two books as well. The first was a bit faster to get going than the second, but I felt they both struggled to set the scene and get all the characters introduced and into position before it got interesting. Not surprised really to hear the third is the same and a bit worse. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I seem to remember that words of radiance contained absolutely nothing of interest for 900 pages then exploded. I’ve got one page into oathbringer - currently reading the biography of Alexander Hamilton.

 

loved the Broken Earth trilogy over Xmas: quite obvious why the first got a Hugo, and second and third built nicely.

 

also, Senlin Ascends is out this week. If you haven’t, you need to at least try it...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm on part 4 of 5 and it's slowly getting better, but right now I wouldn't really recommend it. It's not bad, but it's nothing special like his best work either. It's a timewaster book but I hardly ever mind putting it down, unlike some his earlier titles which were real pageturners. It just plods along forever with no real stakes, barely any action or adventure, and the characters aren't very interesting (especially as many of the best cast of the first book are hardly featured). One girl is particularly annoying but features in much of the book (not helped by her voice actor, admittedly). Nothing like the fairly tight writing of Age of Kings or the Mistborn series. Sanderson works best when he restricts his cast roster to small numbers, and puts them in a "confined" scenario where he can show his imagination and bring out interesting plot twists and intrigue. 

 

Has anyone read the side stories for the Stormlight saga? In the intro Sanderson says that they are worth checking out as they have references, but I'm in no great hurry to hunt them down after this book.

 

Hurry up George Martin and finish the next Game of Thrones, good fantasy is thin on the ground these days!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I forgot to cancel my three month Audible trial in time and ended up with three credits, thought I may as well try and bust through three books in twenty days or so. Currently on the first Dresden Files, wasn't sold at all for the first bit but it's really got its hooks into me now. James Marsters has a great reading style for it and I'm totally imagining Dresden as Spike with dark hair. 

 

I also have the first two Chalion books to get through, a friend of mine has been banging on about them for ages so I thought why not. Anyone read them? They're eighteen hours apiece so I've some serious listening to get through, I'm already listening every break I get in work! 

 

Re Stormlight, I'm really starting to get bored now. I get there's supposed to be a sense of worldbuilding but it's just crossed miles into self indulgence. I hammered through the first half after the pretty good Words of Radiance and have pretty much crawled to a dead stop about two hundred pages from the end. The only characters to hold my interest are Dalinar and Taravangian, I read the rest on auto pilot. The other irritating thing is that for all the pages of zero action, there's no character building either - they're all pretty much the same as they were one page into Way of Kings, especially the group I've christened The Boring Saviours - Kaladin (who used to be my favourite) = brooding, Adolin = a bit snooty but his heart's in the right place, Shallan = needs a swift shake and a pretty hard slap and FAR less page time, she seems to have had about half the book. 

 

For all the faults of the Malazan series, you can't argue that there's loads of character development and intrigue during the many many many pages of downtime and that's a series specifically designed to put off the casual reader. Stormlight seems to have slid into "complicated, but in a hugely boring and pointless way". I think the editor needed to have a serious word because for a 1200 page doorstopper I reckon there's been about 300 pages worth so far. Compare that to a Joe Abercrombie book where you can have the whole thing done and dusted in under 400 pages and it's really starting to feel like a tremendous chore. 

 

Sorry, ranted on a bit there. I'm off to let James Marsters soothe me by talking about vampires and stuff and occasionally mispronouncing bits but not being arsed to do it again. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read Oathbringer in a weekend, I didn’t do much else, mind.

I’d have found it much more difficult if I’d been listening to an audiobook and not able to just speed through pages.

 

It followed a similar pattern to the previous book: not much, then an explosive conclusion (if not one that felt tightly plotted enough to be satisfying). Dalinar was ok, but, again, insufficient foreshadowing in the present to really make his back story sing; shallan was a little less boring, but a lot more repetitive, and adolin really didn’t follow through on what could have happened. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: Oathbreaker

 

Agree, I think that's one of the problems, the characters hardly change and there's very few who are interesting. Starbreaker mentioned the Malazan series and I was thinking about that too whilst listening to Oathbreaker. I'm on like book 5 or 6 of Malazan and it's characters, intrigue, universe and plotlines are so much more entertaining than the treading water this series has become. In Malazan even though there are few battles, there's always tons of interesting stuff going on, and the characters and their shifting alliegances and politics keep it engaging. Although the politics in Oathbreaker is kind of welcome as Sanderson fleshes out the world, it ends up being really dull as Dalinar's never ending quest in appealing to the other world leaders. Like you say, Shallan is just like a repeat of book 2, and she's so bloody annoying I want to slap her. Dalinar is probably the best though his flashbacks feel very tacked on, Kaladin's story is pretty much over, Adolin is boring, Bridge 4 is Bridge 4. I'm still on part 4/5 but I think Elokar has potential to be a good character. I agree Terevangian is probably the most interesting character and it's that kind of intrigue that the story needs. Wit is good too.

 

It's testament to the plodding storyline that I found the interlude short stories way more interesting than the main plot, and would have preffered to hear more about them instead!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think Sanderson is for me. It's a shame as I'd like to be a fan given that he puts out so many books, wouldn't have to wait long for something to come out.

 

I enjoyed the WoT books he did, read Mistborn which was OK, read the first Stormlight book which I didn't enjoy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Headache said:

Assassin's Apprentice. Start with The Farseer Trilogy.

 

Seconded, then just read them in sequence. Take a break between trilogies if you like.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished ‘The Waking Fire’ by Anthony Ryan. 

 

Slightly unusually for fantasy the setting is akin to 19th century Europe in terms of technology and the world being largely controlled by corporations analogous to the East India Company. Dragon Blood is a hugely valuable commodity and facilitates a type of magic which only certain people are able to use. The author himself said he was influenced by Dune and spice in that regard. 

 

It’s really quite good. First of a trilogy. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Because my finger is always on the pulse, I've just read through the Patricia A. McKillip's Riddlemaster series (having loved The Forgotten Beasts of Eld a few years back, after somebody in here recommended it). It was a bit fucking excellent; a bit less of the ethereal quality that I so enjoyed in Forgotten Beasts, but I loved that once again the stories are always touched by a mythical, almost whimsical quality, and set their (otherwise epic) narrative in a world that isn't afraid to feel small.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.