Jump to content
kerraig UK

A movie watchers blog

Recommended Posts

Ahh, I saw If… mentioned in lordcookies Films on This Week thread and I wanted to watch it but I forgot. God damn, I really loved O Lucky Man.

I've never seen O Lucky Man but really want to now

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been watching some screwballs: The Philadelphia Story, The Awful Truth, His Girl Friday. In all of them so far it's turned out Cary Grant is divorced and flirting with his ex-wife. How often did they use that set-up!? I guess divorce seemed like a daring, fashionably naughty subject for film. It means that the dame is no virgin so it's OK to get fresh with her, the main relationship is already set-up as antagonistic and flirtatious, and you leave open the possibility of them forgetting their differences and giving things another go.

Sometimes with old films you feel that we do things better these days (editing, action sequences and so on), but we can't touch these sort of films. I don't think we make these quick-fire, joke-upon-joke, sophisticated comedies any more. I suppose the writing talent is working on TV sitcoms these days, and maybe these sort of scripts are seen as televisual rather than cinematic.

I think Cary Grant is the best. He's rapidly becoming my favourite old-time movie star. I take back that thing in the Michael Clayton thread where I said George Clooney might stand to be compared to those old guys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They were showing a few Cary Grant films during the day a couple of weeks ago. I wasn't home for them but mother and baby struck it lucky. I did manage to catch I Was A Male War Bride, which I hadn't seen before and was good fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched Donnie Brasco last night for the first time in ages. Me and the wife have just finished the Sopranos so now we're going to watch a load of Mob movies to help soften the blow of no more Tony and everyone.

Its such a great film. Al Pacino especially is just superb. A really understated performance by him (which is rare). His last great performance? Could be.

One thing that was quite mad watching it back was in the famous Forgetaboutit scene. The two FBI guys asking him about it were played by then unknown Paul Giamatti and Tim Blake Nelson. I love watching old films and seeing now famous actors pop up in small roles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tonight I watched a great film

American Gangster (2007) on HD DVD - http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0765429/

It is a film directed by Ridley Scott, and acted by Russell Crowe and Denzel Washington. Both performance is outstanding.

Russell Crowe played a honest Detective Richie Roberts who have return nearly a millions pounds to the police in the 70s and lead the fightback against Drugs.

Denzel played as a black heroin kingpin which is unheard of at the time who cut out middleman from importing from asia.

The story is interesting and the ending is good as well.

It is more interesting than other drugs related films. 4.5 stars out of 5.

Downside is HD DVD have one side which is normal cut of film in HD and other side is extended cut of film in non HD which means I can't watch it for extra 20 minutes.

  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've been watching some screwballs: The Philadelphia Story, The Awful Truth, His Girl Friday. In all of them so far it's turned out Cary Grant is divorced and flirting with his ex-wife. How often did they use that set-up!? I guess divorce seemed like a daring, fashionably naughty subject for film. It means that the dame is no virgin so it's OK to get fresh with her, the main relationship is already set-up as antagonistic and flirtatious, and you leave open the possibility of them forgetting their differences and giving things another go.

Sometimes with old films you feel that we do things better these days (editing, action sequences and so on), but we can't touch these sort of films. I don't think we make these quick-fire, joke-upon-joke, sophisticated comedies any more. I suppose the writing talent is working on TV sitcoms these days, and maybe these sort of scripts are seen as televisual rather than cinematic.

I think Cary Grant is the best. He's rapidly becoming my favourite old-time movie star. I take back that thing in the Michael Clayton thread where I said George Clooney might stand to be compared to those old guys.

Sorry to skip back a bit but I missed this post the first time around. You should really read the book by George Stevens Jr (son of the director George Stevens) called Conversations With The Great Moviemakers of Hollywood's Golden Age at the American Film Institute. They have some wonderful transcripts of interviews with directors like Howard Hawks where they explain a lot of their approach to screw ball and the pacing. It turns out that a lot of things you might read in Cahiers Du Cinema etc is wrong! Hawks even shits on their theories of John Ford, telling some home truths about his shot selection.

I love screwball comedies and comedies from the 1930s in general. His Girl Friday is one of my favourites, but yes most of them are about a divorce. Even It Happened One Night is about a divorce, as Clauette Colbert has been just married to her husband before the film begins and her father wants them seperated which prompts the whole rest of the picture. I think you'd really enjoy the early Marx brothers pictures with Dumont, because a lot of them are based around a kind of reverse. She's an old widower and so, in wooing her, anything goes.

Cary Grant was fantastic and according to Hawks needed very little direction. "Why, divorce doesn't mean anything nowadays Hildy, it's just a few words mumbled over you by a judge!" I love how he treats Hildy's new husband to be in His Girl Friday. "Galoshes too I hope? That a boy!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This morning I watched Princess Bride off the TV. Which is mentioned in Lord Cookie's thread.

It is a enjoyable film despite the film is not shown in widescreen. (arrgghh) There are nice characters and the bad prince/king is a bit of wimp. It is a film for kids. The storytelling by Peter Falk is a nice touch (Colombo). The storyline is quiet good ie characters and man in black and princess buttercup.

  • Upvote 1
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This morning I watched Princess Bride off the TV. Which is mentioned in Lord Cookie's thread.

It is a enjoyable film despite the film is not shown in widescreen. (arrgghh) There are nice characters and the bad prince/king is a bit of wimp. It is a film for kids. The storytelling by Peter Falk is a nice touch (Colombo). The storyline is quiet good ie characters and man in black and princess buttercup.

You need to be showing it more love. Its one of my favourite films.....ever. Perhaps thats because I first saw it as a kid but I still think its so much more than a kids film

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's wrong with it being just a kids film anyway? A good kids film will entertain adults too without the need for putting in crappy pop culture references and the like. The early Disney and many of the early Studio Ghibli films are aimed at children but adults still enjoy them because the quality shine through.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tonight I watched another film

This time it is Mystic River on DVD which is directed by Clint Eastwood.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0327056/

The film is about the life of 3 childhood friends in Boston 20 years later when Jimmy Marcus (Sean Penn), Sean Devine a cop (Kevin Bacon) and Dave Boyle (Tim Robbins) reunite after the murder of Jimmy's 19-year old daughter... (Not bad looking) The story is very good and full of twists.

It is quality acting, film making and I could tell it is Clint Eastwood film. The two main characters have won the Oscars. (No complaint) It is a serious drama / thriller. It is not a pop corn or warm and fluffy film. 4 out 5 stars rating for me.

Great things about summer is we can watch movies more often :ph34r:

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've just watched In the Bedroom that I'd recorded last week. It got a good write-up when first released so I was really glad to see it, found it to be really engrossing. Tom Wilkinson and Sissy Spacek were both very good in it.

I've also got The Man Who Wasn't There still to watch, one of the few Coen brothers' films I've not seen yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry Ledge I thought Mystic River was total bolloxs, who's with me?! Yaaah!

I found in the bedroom interesting enough, but very depressing, not something I would seek out or having seen it felt I would have missed out on something special. A solid, grim, well acted drama. You're in for a treat with TMWWT, up there with the best of the Coens.

I'm thinking of watching The Assassination of Jesse James tonight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sorry to skip back a bit but I missed this post the first time around. You should really read the book by George Stevens Jr (son of the director George Stevens) called Conversations With The Great Moviemakers of Hollywood's Golden Age at the American Film Institute. They have some wonderful transcripts of interviews with directors like Howard Hawks where they explain a lot of their approach to screw ball and the pacing. It turns out that a lot of things you might read in Cahiers Du Cinema etc is wrong! Hawks even shits on their theories of John Ford, telling some home truths about his shot selection.

I love screwball comedies and comedies from the 1930s in general. His Girl Friday is one of my favourites, but yes most of them are about a divorce. Even It Happened One Night is about a divorce, as Clauette Colbert has been just married to her husband before the film begins and her father wants them seperated which prompts the whole rest of the picture. I think you'd really enjoy the early Marx brothers pictures with Dumont, because a lot of them are based around a kind of reverse. She's an old widower and so, in wooing her, anything goes.

Cary Grant was fantastic and according to Hawks needed very little direction. "Why, divorce doesn't mean anything nowadays Hildy, it's just a few words mumbled over you by a judge!" I love how he treats Hildy's new husband to be in His Girl Friday. "Galoshes too I hope? That a boy!"

Ordered the book, thanks! I'm planning to watch It Happened One Night this week.

His Girl Friday has such a sparkling script. Can't remember if I've seen the original version (The Front Page) or not, so I'm not sure how much was Ben Hecht's but I love the telegram that brought the scriptwriter to Hollywood.

Will you accept $300 per week to work for Paramount Pictures. All expenses paid. The $300 is peanuts. Millions are to be grabbed out here and your only competition is idiots. Don't let this get around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I caught the last half-hour of The Princess Bride over the weekend; despite the awful score and flat lighting, there are bits of the film that move me more than pretty much anything else. That scene where Inigo Montoya finally catches up with Count Rugen, gets a knife in the stomach, and almost fails is just pure gold. When he delivers the payoff line at the end - "I want my father back, you son of a bitch" – I let out a little gasp of pure emotion, and I could feel tears in my eyes. There's just something about that scene – it's very well performed, but the scriptwriting is just peerless. Absolutely awe-inspiring.

I also watched 'An American Werewolf in London' for the first time in ages. It's a genuinely scary film in places, but overall a slightly uncomfortable mix. It feels like a short story stretched out to feature length, and the abrupt ending was a bit unsatisfactory. I was mystified by the bizarrely savage car crash sequence in Piccadilly Circus, as it seemed to have come from a different film entirely.

It's also driven home just how amazingly HOT Jenny Agutter was in 1981. What with her, and my obsession with the woman from Ashes to Ashes, it seems like 1981 was the year that London's women peaked in terms of sex appeal. If nothing else, it's spurred me on to finish my time machine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sorry Ledge I thought Mystic River was total bolloxs, who's with me?! Yaaah!

Mystic River is rubbish. Not only did Penn and Robbins not deserve Oscars for their overbearing performances but the film has plot holes galore which stretch the logic to breaking point.

Are we really supposed to believe two seperate murders occur on the same day linked with the same family? And that the evidence for the daughter's murder has been lying around the police station from the very beginning but only discovered when it is all too late. Films always rely on an audience buying into the events but the level of coincidence in this film is staggering.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Threw on Unbreakable the other night.

Decent little flick with some good, believable performances.

Great score, to boot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched Shooter again last night in HD. I really like it. It reminds me of a modern day Commando, with a lovely introductory 45 minutes or so. I had no idea what it was about the first time I saw it, so it took me completely by surprise. Mark Walhberg's as watchable as ever, and it also has the lovely Kate Mara in it (I've no idea if her accent is like that in real life, but it definitely isn't when I imagine her as my wife).

Don't read anything about it if you're planning on watching it. Every description I've seen of the film contains a spoiler, even though it's quite an obvious one once the film gets going.

"Bono? You want them to get Bono?"

Edit: Also, good call Vin. Unbreakable's a superb little flick that gets a lot of unwarranted criticism simply because it's a Shyamalan film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mystic River is rubbish. Not only did Penn and Robbins not deserve Oscars for their overbearing performances but the film has plot holes galore which stretch the logic to breaking point.

Are we really supposed to believe two seperate murders occur on the same day linked with the same family? And that the evidence for the daughter's murder has been lying around the police station from the very beginning but only discovered when it is all too late. Films always rely on an audience buying into the events but the level of coincidence in this film is staggering.

Aye, one of those acclaimed films I can't get my head around, the whole thing was just rubbish, and the acting was laughable, except for Bacon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another Shyamalan flick; Signs.

Tidy, tense movie that still bangs out a few real scares.

Dig the performances too, and the score's magic.

Check it out if it's passed you by.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night I watched 3 flicks. but one stood out (surprisingly). "Little Children" I'd never even heard of it, but from the very first minutes it had grabbed me. It's a pure drama, but it's a well written one. Like 'Magnolia' and 'Short Cuts' it's a movie that is covering several fates over a short time, but it's a lot more 'thourough' in it's pacing and story telling. One could argue that the original story is shallow by saying that "every character in the entire movie is both good and bad at the same time" but that would be missing the point, imo.

You get to meet Kate Winslet as a love hungering female, whose husband is tied up at work (and is hungering for advanced sex, something he (wrongly) thinks his wife can never give him), and Patrick Wilson as her love interest (and her personla oposite). Both deliver painstakeingly belieavable roles, but it's the world around them that makes the movie what it is (which is great). Around them you have the paedo flashing psycho, played incredibly by fairly unknown Jackie Earle Haley (although this role will secure several jobs in Hollywood for years after this), a hardworking and naive wife played by Jennifer Connelly (who is looking more and more like a young 'n fit Demi Moore), and a lot of other interesting characters. While not as good as either Magnolia or Short Cuts, this is drama of highest calibre, and should be watched by everyone with a soft spot for the genre (as well as anyone with offspring under their roof).

I give this movie an impressive 9/10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bacon is such an underrated actor. I felt really sorry for him when his inferior co-stars walked away with the awards instead of him.

Have you seen "The Woodsman"? He plays a raging paedo with a sensitive side. It's really good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Even It Happened One Night is about a divorce, as Clauette Colbert has been just married to her husband before the film begins and her father wants them seperated which prompts the whole rest of the picture.

Claudette Colbert in a man's pyjamas is the cat's pyjamas.

post-83-1212483041_thumb.jpg

My next observation of comedies of this era are just how willing men are to hit women, and to cow them into submission. Clark Cable threatens to slap a woman to shut her up and cow her to his will, looking all "masterful", and the woman almost swoons.

Also, faces must go in and out of fashion. Clark Cable, by today's tastes, is kinda funny looking. Just take a look at those lugs!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.