Jump to content
rundll

Photography Equipment & Software Thread

Recommended Posts

Yeah, I'm thinking the same. Phone cameras have pretty much destroyed the compact market. Four thirds / APS-C cameras still hold a significant advantage over them... but increasingly they can do with sensors and software what used to require physics and glass. TBH I was hoping to get a full-frame rangefinder style camera at some point anyway. You can only get so much depth of field control with smaller sensors at short focal lengths... and I've had a film camera of that style (with a fixed lens) that was pretty portable. Hoping someone comes out with a digital equivalent that I can actually afford. I'm pretty happy with my current system, and would probably keep it around in any case, but that's what I'm pining for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Liamness said:

Yeah, I'm thinking the same. Phone cameras have pretty much destroyed the compact market. Four thirds / APS-C cameras still hold a significant advantage over them... but increasingly they can do with sensors and software what used to require physics and glass. TBH I was hoping to get a full-frame rangefinder style camera at some point anyway. You can only get so much depth of field control with smaller sensors at short focal lengths... and I've had a film camera of that style (with a fixed lens) that was pretty portable. Hoping someone comes out with a digital equivalent that I can actually afford. I'm pretty happy with my current system, and would probably keep it around in any case, but that's what I'm pining for.

 

This was an interesting look at the shortcomings of Apple’s Portrait Mode on the new iPhone.

 

 

To be fair, It’s impressive stuff, albeit with obvious shortcomings, and for the casual photographer who doesn’t really care about the technical aspects of photography, it’ll be a cool new effect to (over)use.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, Naysonymous said:

Am I being daft for wondering why nobody has attempted to combine Apple/Google style photo algorithms with a large sensor and interchangeable lenses?  

 

Mostly the camera companies are shit at software and you can do that kind of thing in post.

Closest you're probably going to get is that new Zeiss camera which looks as thought it runs Android to run Lightroom on camera

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I appreciate that but I don't get why camera manufacturers are still shit at software though.  The iPhone has been out for ten years, they've seen the effect that smartphones have had on camera sales and they seem really slow to react. I'm pretty new to all this, though I've always enjoyed photography through my dad who was into it back in the 80s (his CB handle was "photolens") and just looking at the state of things through the eyes of someone who has a baseline set in 2017/2018 it's mental how many people don't appear (or want) to see the benefits of things like EVFs and touch screens.  Maybe this current mirrorless push is the beginning of the computerisation of the camera, maybe it's just a fad, but something needs to be done. Kodak and Polaroid let the grass grow beneath their feet and look what happened there, surely this last decade has shown that software is king and if your company can't do great software from within then they need to hire someone who can?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Liamness said:

Yeah, I'm thinking the same. Phone cameras have pretty much destroyed the compact market. Four thirds / APS-C cameras still hold a significant advantage over them... but increasingly they can do with sensors and software what used to require physics and glass. TBH I was hoping to get a full-frame rangefinder style camera at some point anyway. You can only get so much depth of field control with smaller sensors at short focal lengths...  and I've had a film camera of that style (with a fixed lens) that was pretty portable. Hoping someone comes out with a digital equivalent that I can actually afford. I'm pretty happy with my current system, and would probably keep it around in any case, but that's what I'm pining for.

 

Really, the difference for me between crop sensors and full frame (or 35mm or medium format film) is depth of field.

 

With m4/3 I mostly shoot on 'P' and to be honest I never really notice what aperture or shutter speed is selected - I know depth of field is going to be good, and ibis takes care of slow shutter speeds. True point and shoot which is kind of refreshing.

As you say though, it's harder to get a narrow depth of field if that's your thing. I trialled shooting the 25mm f1.7 wide open, and still most stuff was in focus 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Naysonymous said:

I appreciate that but I don't get why camera manufacturers are still shit at software though.  The iPhone has been out for ten years, they've seen the effect that smartphones have had on camera sales and they seem really slow to react. I'm pretty new to all this, though I've always enjoyed photography through my dad who was into it back in the 80s (his CB handle was "photolens") and just looking at the state of things through the eyes of someone who has a baseline set in 2017/2018 it's mental how many people don't appear (or want) to see the benefits of things like EVFs and touch screens.  Maybe this current mirrorless push is the beginning of the computerisation of the camera, maybe it's just a fad, but something needs to be done. Kodak and Polaroid let the grass grow beneath their feet and look what happened there, surely this last decade has shown that software is king and if your company can't do great software from within then they need to hire someone who can?

 

Canon and Nikon are dead men walking really. They made the jump from film to digital, but I don't think they'll survive the transition to photography driven by software.

They've been too held back by fears of cannibalising their DSLR sales (and pro video cams in the case of Canon) to truly innovate.

Kodak made the first digital camera, but they binned it as they where worried about film sales.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hey folks, just wanted to post this here...i dont think thats against the rules...is it?

im selling my pentax K5 if anybody is interested!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's the consensus on using lightroom to edit photos in the photography community? I recently got me a Nikon D3300 and have been snapping away but without tweaking my snaps with lightroom they look dull and badly framed. My goal is to take good enough snaps that only a little lightroom editing is required.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use it and I think the view is if your shooting Raw then you will need to do some minor adjustments in a photo editor to some degree as the raw image won't reflect the scene as your eye would see it. 

 

Framing the shot by taking your time with setting up your composition will be crucial to a decent photo. If this is wrong then its difficult to come back from it even with crops and clarity saturation etc in LR. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm shooting raw + jpeg but using only raw for photos I like and want to Polish up and keep. Some of my photos require small adjustments but most photos require heavy editing until I'm happy with them.

 

I've started a Flickr account and I'm uploading my pics as jpegs full-size all rights reserved copyright, I have no idea if this is the done thing?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I personally shoot raw-only, and process everything in Lightroom (and I think that quite a lot of other people use the same basic flow). Starting to do that, is probably the single most significant thing I've done to increase my interest and satisfaction in photography, apart of course from getting my first decent camera...

In certain cases very little adjustment is needed, in other cases quite a bit - it mostly depends on the scene and conditions (for instance, a highly dynamic scene (very bright areas and very dark areas) will need some adjustments to be able to show both highlights and shadows), and on if I want to show the photo as "it was", or if have some artistic idea for it. 

 

I recently did a photowalk with my girlfriend, who's getting into photography too, and made some before/after Lightroom comparisons for her to see the possible difference.

Before:

LR-Web-1173.jpg

 

After:

LR-Web-1173-2.jpg

 

Before:

LR-Web-1177.jpg

 

After:

LR-Web-1177-2.jpg

 

Before:

LR-Web-1179.jpg

 

After:

LR-Web-1179-2.jpg

 

Before:

LR-Web-1181.jpg

 

After:

LR-Web-1181-2.jpg

 

 

In the end though, it's all about what you want to do, and what you feel happy about. If a good bit of editing makes you happy with the photos, then just edit them and be happy - photography is not necessarily about showing the subject as it is, but more about how you want to show it. Sometimes you want to show it as close to reality as possible, sometimes you want to interpret the subject in some way. It's always going to be subjective, and some people are going to like your style, others probably aren't - so personally, I just try to at least find something that I like myself :) 

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your just starting out and learning, keep all your images and revisit them when you have increased your skills in photo editing as your can have a rubbish image today but in a years time it may be a good image. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Max Damage said:

What's the consensus on using lightroom to edit photos in the photography community? I recently got me a Nikon D3300 and have been snapping away but without tweaking my snaps with lightroom they look dull and badly framed. My goal is to take good enough snaps that only a little lightroom editing is required.

 

 

Pretty much every photo you see, whether film or digital, has been post-processed in some way, so don’t worry about using Lightroom to edit your images. It’s not cheating, and it doesn’t make you a lesser photographer. How, and how much, you process your photos is your choice.

 

I would suggest always trying to frame your images correctly in camera though. Composition and lighting are extremely important. Digital gives a lot of leeway for cropping of photos but it’s always best to get as much right at the time of shooting as you possibly can, even if your intent is to crop to a different ratio (e.g. square) later.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I shoot RAW + JPG on my Pen-F and do everything I can to get it right in camera. 70% of the time I'll just use the JPG. The RAW is there as a safety net, in case AWB has farted, I've missed exposure, or if I've screwed up the framing slightly (I shoot 3:2 on an m43 camera, which gives you a slight buffer zone on the long edges, only held in the RAW). I do my fixing in the official Olympus app which is pretty shonky performance and U wise, but exactly replicates the camera processing, which I like.

 

I basically hate post-processing, but having a second chance to get it right the first time is nice!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use the cameras histogram extensively, and always 'expose to the right'. This means all of my images look over exposed when I put them on the computer, so they all need tweaking to reduce exposure.

 

Cameras are much better at going from over exposed down, rather than under exposed and up. The latter creates nasty noise and colour banding where as the former gives much more of a colour range. 

 

Histograms are essential. Expose as close to the right edge with going over, which means you've blown highlights and cannot recover part (or all) of the image. 

 

And as fishyfish says, all images you see are processed in some way. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, PopeSmokesDope said:

And the paedos are back on flickr...

 

Just had loads of my photos faved... funnily enough its just the skateboarding ones of boys bending over... and then the invites start for this group https://www.flickr.com/groups/1520929@N22/

 

which whilst none of the photos in there are dodgy its fairly obvious why they are all in the group....

 

 

Click on that link and it shows a 'This group is 18+, do you wish to enter' below a photo of some kids playing in orchestra....

Using the report abuse button and then select problem with a group it tells you to talk to the admin of the group :/

 

All the paedos going over to Flickr after being booted off Tumblr ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They’ve always been around... currently arguing with Flickr on twitter as they don’t seem to get the point that the admins are in on it... the accounts are blatantly

easy to spot... they don’t have any photos themselves but have thousands of faved photos all of young boys with their tops off or bending over... yeah it’s not strictly illegal but it’s dodgy as fuck...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure this is the thread but I'll ask anyway. Mostly for London folk, but I'm having a day out next week to take in the Canary Wharf winter lights but I've booked a spot at sunset in the Sky Garden. I'll be carrying a tripod with me for the winter lights but the sky garden website says they don't allow tripod use. Can I take it up anyway? I normally just have it clipped to my rucksack but if they are pissy about that then would I just be able to keep it in the tripod bag? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, a Gorilla Pod might be ok (as long as there's somewhere to stand / afix it). I think the main reason for preventing the use of full-size tripods is that they will cause an obstruction, both in preventing non-photographers from being able to enjoy the view, but also in the event of an emergency where they would potentially pose a hazard.

 

Alternatively, and again dependent on where you can position them, a small bean-bag type support might work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.