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Found 4 results

  1. Qazimod

    Persona 5 | PS3, PS4

    LATEST RELEASE INFO AND MISC DLC NOTES: It's been over eight years since a mainline Persona game has come to Europe (in its original form, that is - Golden was obviously more recent), and in late November of 2013 series fans watched a stream that would ultimately reveal that Persona 5 was happening, and would release in Japan in the Winter of 2014. So naturally, it came to Japan in September 2016. The west wasn't immune to delays either, with the US and European release slipping from 14 February 2017 to 4 April 2017. It's finally here though, and you can skip past the dozen or so pages of pre-release hype if you just want to get to the post-release discussion. If there's anything people want me to add to this OP - content news, beginner tips, whatever - let me know, and obviously keep your spoiler etiquette in check. Launch DLC: JP audio track (free): https://store.playstation.com/#!/en-gb/games/addons/persona-5-japanese-audio-track/cid=EP4062-CUSA06638_00-ADDCONTENT000022 Skill cards (free): https://store.playstation.com/#!/en-gb/games/addons/persona-5-skill-card-set/cid=EP4062-CUSA06638_00-ADDCONTENT000021 Healing items (free): https://store.playstation.com/#!/en-gb/games/addons/persona-5-healing-item-set/cid=EP4062-CUSA06638_00-ADDCONTENT000020 Merciless difficulty (free): https://store.playstation.com/#!/en-gb/games/addons/persona-5-merciless-difficulty/cid=EP4062-CUSA06638_00-ADDCONTENT000025 LATEST MEDIA: Thanks to @Vemsie for highlighting the latest "sizzle trailer", below: http://www.atlus.com/persona5/ If you're wondering what a Persona is, I've provided a little primer below:
  2. UPDATE: P3:DMN and P5: DSN are expected to be released in Japan on May 24 2018. https://www.vg247.com/2017/08/02/all-the-persona-news-from-todays-livestream-persona-5-dancing-star-night-persona-3-dancing-moon-night-persona-q2/ Okay, there was no way they could ever match the hype of the P5 reveal stream (which teased Ultimax, Q, Dancing and P5) but this is good news for fans of those series. Me, I don't own a 3DS (or care about EO gameplay) and I still haven't played P4D, but they seem like perfect sequel and spin-off fodder. (I would have loved a new Arena though, grumble grumble...) P3 Dancing trailer: P5 Dancing trailer: PQ2 teaser site
  3. We do it! I've had this game in a library of an old PSP account for what must be years, and as a big fan of the later games I was always disappointed at the fact that I bounced off it so hard. For those who don't know, the Persona series is a bunch of popular JRPG games that follow a group of demon-summoning high-schoolers who go dungeon-crawling and uncover some big adventure or mystery. The 1996 game was already obscure enough, but Europe never really got their hands on it before the PSP release in 2010, so gamers over here can hardly be blamed for having P3 or 4 as their introduction to the series. As a fan of 3 and 4 I was keen on taking a look at the origins of the series, and so I bought the PSP release digitally. Unfortunately, the first game is very different to how we view Persona today. With grid-based first-person dungeon exploration, a grid-based battle system where character positioning plays a part in tactics and negotiation that's much more in-depth than it was in 5… one would be forgiven for feeling a little overwhelmed. I tried pretty hard to get into it on PSP but with so much to consider it can be a slog to say the least. Making this thread should – in theory – motivate me into trying again and not give up partway through. However, I'll outline a few caveats about how I'd like this thread to go. Firstly: I'd like to play on the lower difficulty because I have barely any experience with this game. For what it's worth, I played P3 and 4 on Easy for the first attempts and today I use Normal mode in those games, so forgive this wussing out. If all goes well I might even use this thread for a Normal mode re-run in the distant future! Secondly: I'd encourage anyone else who wants to join in to do so, but keep spoiler etiquette in mind. Perhaps I'll miss bonus optional stuff, but that's all part of the first experience. One other caveat – for screenshot purposes, I'll be using the PPSSPP emulator. Like I said, I have bought the PSP digital release before, but this will be much more convenient for screenshotting. And of course, if this thread sees no action for months, you're welcome to mock me on Twitter or in PMs and motivate me into coming back!
  4. Qazimod

    Persona 4 Golden

    With the Euro release landing this week (Wednesday for SEN/PSN and Friday for brick-and-mortar retailers) I thought that it might be a good idea to get a thread started in preparation for Persona 4 Golden's release. Oh, and Yasawas and Dandy_Sephy expressed interest in seeing a dedicated thread. Released in 2009 on the PS2, Persona 4 arrived very late on Sony's last-gen console, but it's remained one of the most charming and rewarding JRPGs out there and is one of my all-time favourite games. It's a story that revolves around a group of high-school students in Inaba who stumble across an alternate world inside televisions where dangerous creatures known as Shadows roam. A friendly character within this world tells the students that someone has been kidnapping people and throwing them into TVs, and this provides the setup for most of the rest of the game, as the students set about exploring the TV world in order to rescue people trapped there and perhaps get more clues about the kidnapper and (ultimately) the nature of the TV world. The beauty about the Persona games – at least, the later ones – is that they are really several games rolled into one. Exploring the TV world forms the core dungeon grind, but the heroes are still only students, and get up to student-y things such as studying for exams, answering quick quizzes in class, hanging out with friends in a sort of dating-sim lite (without all the creepiness), working part-time jobs that help to boost stats and earn money, fishing for things at the river, accepting occasional sidequests from people in Inaba and more besides. Whilst you get to explore various different dungeons in the TV world, Inaba's available locations largely stay the same, and so variety comes from the in-game calendar. On each new day there may be different people in town that you can spend time with, different jobs available, books being released in the bookstore which you can buy and read at home to boost stats, and more besides. The calendar also serves as motivation to rescue people from the TV world before it's too late. Once you finish your school day and are free to explore the town, you have the option of entering the TV world through a large flatscreen in a local department store, which is the only way to enter dungeons and battle through them to save victims. The dungeon design is perhaps one of my favourite things about later Persona games, since each one is made up of several "floors", with the dungeon getting progressively harder from floor to floor, culminating in a boss battle on the final floor. It gives players a nice way of knowing if they're out of their depth and need to step back a few floors before progressing. Battles aren't random but are triggered in a stealth-lite format; if a Shadow spots you a "!" will appear above them and they'll give chase; if they strike you they will gain a free turn at the start of the battle; however, if you strike them without them noticing, your party gets the opening strike. The battles require you to take advantage of elemental strengths and weaknesses; the eponymous Persona that the students eventually gain are demons that can be summoned in battle and offer a selection of skills; buffs, nerfs, physical and elemental attacks, healing, etc. However, each persona can also be strong and weak against certain elements. If an elemental weakness is exposed on either a player or an enemy, a free turn is granted to whoever exposed the weakness. Therefore, a player who knows certain weaknesses in advance can exploit them one after the other with successive turns, knocking down enemies and potentially earning the chance to do a powerful "all-out attack" if all enemies are downed. In having such a satisfying combat system, giving the player plenty to do outside of the dungeon, and designing each dungeon to get progressively more challenging as the player escalates, it nearly always feels rewarding to play. There are a few difficulty spikes with certain bosses, but things only really get hard if you deliberately rush through dungeons and avoid encounters. Reading back through what I've written it sounds a bit like a review but I really just wanted to provide a primer for people who are new to Persona and want to know what all the fuss is about. If anyone wants to add anything I've missed, feel free. I should just stress that there may be some details I've missed and there may still be bits that will be confusing to newcomers when they get their hands on the game, so I hope that we can get some good discussion going between new and experienced players. I was impatient and ended up importing the US version (and I know others did as well) but if enough people are getting into this for the first time I'll probably start a new game with you all. PS EU Blog: A beginner's guide to Persona 4
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